Von Zimmer: Freddie’s Extra Teeth

A review on indie rock artist Von Zimmer's new album

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Von Zimmer: Freddie’s Extra Teeth

The empty railroad portrays the rustic mood of the album

The empty railroad portrays the rustic mood of the album

From the album lyric book

The empty railroad portrays the rustic mood of the album

From the album lyric book

From the album lyric book

The empty railroad portrays the rustic mood of the album

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Rooted in South Dakota, indie rock songwriter Von Zimmer brings a rustic sound as well as elements of punk rock in his new album “Freddie’s Extra Teeth.” The album’s name references Freddie Mercury’s refusal to remove his extra teeth in fear of losing his ability to sing high notes. The album opens with the first song titled “The End of the World.” As interesting as it is to begin the album with a song titled “The End of the World,” this shows Zimmer’s quality of bringing ironic humor into the mix. The song brings a sense of familiarity that reminds one of a long road trip in the desert or countryside.

Songs “Echo” and “Where Were You” follow. The two songs include raw and quick-witted lyrics, a characteristic that is consistent in the album. The songs also possess qualities of backbone edginess that blends well with Zimmer’s gritty voice. “Archimedes Beer” definitely exemplifies humorous cynicism and angst with lyrics such as “shivering cold and the furnace doesn’t care” and “that car insurance quote didn’t save me a dime.” The next song, “The Road to Nod”, illustrates a different take on the biblical story of Cain and Abel, while “Your Song” portrays the endearment of a modern love story.

The album continues with its same sound but becomes a little more aggressive yet poetic as Zimmer tells of the dark reality and consequences of war in the song “Mystery Man.” “Epic Fail Blues” is probably the most punk-rock influenced song as it possesses an energetic beat with lyrics that reveal the ugly truths and backgrounds of serial killers. The last two songs, “A Groat Named Costard” and “Tragic Fall from Grace” end the album casually although the songs display great meaning.

Most of the themes in Zimmer’s songs juggle certain controversial aspects of society, but he manages to disguise them with a sounds that makes listeners feel at home no matter where they are. At first glance one might find his music to be quite eccentric but with deeper evaluation notice the ingenious purpose and sincerity behind it.

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