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Filed under Columns, Showcase

Social Media and the Presidential Image

President Trump’s method of communication proves potentially harmful

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Over the course of centuries, the way the president interacts with the people has evolved. FDR used radio fireside chats to open up issues to the public, informing them on his policies.

Nixon gave speeches on television, which allowed people to hear his side of the story directly from him. Obama used podcasts and viral videos to promote his policies. All of these resources gave the president a way to connect to the people.

Trump has taken a different approach through his continual use of Twitter.  However, this social media platform has given him a way to communicate while bypassing the regulation of words past presidents have undergone.

Previously, words were critiqued and tweaked in order to keep peace and promote the message desired, whether they were to be spoken at a rally or in a video. Now Trump’s tweets show his thoughts clearly, however his presentation may not be presidential.

His honest tweets are attractive in a sea of facades and formulated responses and have ultimately gained the attention of the people. However, his constant negativity has aided the distrust harbored by thousands.

Trump’s dominating presence on Twitter has altered the feed of teens and young adults across the country. Instead of seeing links to articles of current events or updates from their friends, they are reading up to 280 words of his current thoughts, or lack-there-of, on political issues.

Due to his improper English or bluntness, his Twitter has evolved into a hub for meme artists, teenagers looking for laughs, and adults simply yearning for explanations. “Fake News” and “Covfefe” are just two of many memes fabricated from Trump’s tweets.

At first, his lack of formality appealed to voters, but in combination with false information, has lead them to disregard what he says. Last July, he tweeted “We begin bombing in five minutes. This will be YUGE.” What may seem like a joke could lead to some serious consequences for the US.

Though his method of communication may help him “walk among the people,” the way he composes his thoughts have harmed the public’s morale.

In order to change the way people view his presidency, Trump should take some time to think about and edit what he is sharing with the public. Originality and honesty are still important, but the presentation of how he feels is key in rebuilding trust.

 

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Social Media and the Presidential Image