My Winter Break Binge: Gilmore Girls

Three weeks of poptarts, coffee, and witty banter

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My Winter Break Binge: Gilmore Girls

Watch all 7 seasons on Netflix plus A Year in the Life!

Watch all 7 seasons on Netflix plus A Year in the Life!

Photo via Flickr under the Creative Commons License

Watch all 7 seasons on Netflix plus A Year in the Life!

Photo via Flickr under the Creative Commons License

Photo via Flickr under the Creative Commons License

Watch all 7 seasons on Netflix plus A Year in the Life!

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On November 25th, 2016, the Netflix Original series “Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life” was aired.

Before that, however, there was the subtle hints of pictures with poptart and apple appetizers (before the pizza arrived, obviously) and large, steaming mugs of coffee.

As someone who had never watched the dramedy, Gilmore Girls, I didn’t really care. I had heard of the show: Mom and daughter duo, coffee fiends, references galore, and of course, lots and lots of basic drama. It didn’t appeal to me apart from my matching love of coffee. But, then I got curious after seeing so many pictures  with subtitles on Pinterest that actually made me laugh.

So I made it my mission to binge watch Gilmore Girls, both the original and the later years, during the three weeks (plus maybe the week before classes were let out) of much needed break from classes.

It was entertaining to say the least. I found myself knowing most of the pop-culture, political, and academic references, and feeling proud of myself for knowing them. It was surreal, though. I knew these references now, but had I watched it five years ago, or even two years ago, I wouldn’t have caught as many as I did. It was also pretty funny hearing them speak about events like Hillary Clinton doing one thing or another when I knew now that she would eventually run for President of the United States, not once, but twice. Or hear Rory talk about meeting a young Senator Barack Obama visiting Yale and not saying whether or not he was planning to run in the ‘08 elections, and knowing that he would be our President for eight years.

Gilmore Girls was a well scripted show with quirky characters that you got to know, as all people do in small towns like Stars Hollow. There were the obvious questions, like how on Earth did Lorelei afford that humongous house? But I believe that if you are really going to appreciate a show like this, you watch, you enjoy, and you don’t question it too much because it simply spoils it. With Gilmore Girls, you watch to laugh at the ridiculousness of Taylor, Babette, and Mrs. Patty. You watch to love the mother-daughter relationship (and the dysfunction of that entire family, honestly). And you watch because it is easily entertaining. It doesn’t make you think hard but the witty exchanges keep you on your toes. It’s comforting.

I finished it in 2 weeks.

Based on the last season and all the things I wanted to happen, but didn’t, I was excited for the four 90-minute episodes of the Netflix reboot to satisfy me. I was thoroughly happy about the tribute to the late Edward Herrmann, who played Rory’s grandfather, although it did make me a bit choked up. There were so many events I just did not expect to happen and the fact that Jess and Rory didn’t happen (again) was disappointing. It must have taken a tremendous effort to round up so many of the actors to bring back the eclectic characters that make up Stars Hollow, and it was definitely appreciated. But what was unsatisfying was that it ended on a cliff hanger. A four word cliffhanger.
As of now, not even Alexis Bledel knows if she will be playing Rory again now that the infamous final four words have been spoken. My winter binge ended with a sort of cliffhanger soothed by four episodes of closure, followed by an even more unpleasant cliffhanger.

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